Tag Archives: food

Cinco de Mayo celebration livens up the campus with Mexican culture

The Spanish Club on the Ammerman Campus held a Cinco de Mayo celebration in the Eaton’s Neck room on May 7. Festivities included a presentation on Mexico’s history, Hispanic cuisine and a live mariachi band. Faculty advisors Kristin Peters and Cathy Garcia-Hill coordinated the event.

The fiesta was held in Eaton’s Neck room on May 7 from 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

Kristin Peters, left, and Cathy Garcia-Hill are Spanish instructors as well as the faculty advisors for the Spanish Club.

A common misconception is that Cinco de Mayo is Mexico’s Independence Day. In fact, Cinco de Mayo is actually celebrated to honor Mexico’s victory over France at the Battle of Puebla during the French-Mexican War (1861-1867).

An arrangement of tissue paper flowers were on the front table so the girls can wear them in their hair. Sombreros were also available for the gentlemen.

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An assortment of traditional Hispanic cuisine was available, including empanadas, fried plantains and rice with beans.

The live mariachi band livened up the room with traditional Mexican music. They also took song requests from guests.

SCCC students Alicia, and Nick enjoyed the festivities with some empanadas and a complementary Cinco de Mayo-themed word search game.

Fun fact: More than 81 million avocados are consumed on Cinco de Mayo every year in the United States alone.

Suffolk Sentinel reporter Mike Guido got to experience the fiesta as well. Check out his audio piece of the event below.

 

Fun fact: Cinco de Mayo is primarily celebrated in the United States, with the largest celebration being held in Los Angeles. In fact, Cinco de Mayo is not a federal holiday in Mexico. 

All photos by Paula Schultz

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SCCC needs more healthy options to prevent the ‘Freshman 15’

The healthy food section at the Babylon Student Center food court. Photo by Paula Schultz. (April 11, 2018)

The “Freshman 15.” It’s a dreaded phrase that refers to students’ weight gain as they adjust to life in college.

Actually, according to the National Eating Disorder Association, the average college freshman gains about 2.5 to 3.5 pounds during their first year of college.

When students start college, they get exposed to much greater freedom and stress than they did as children and adolescents. The large selection of cheap junk food and lack of exercise can result in an unhealthy lifestyle and weight gain.

At SCCC, the encouragement of student wellness is rather small. All students are required to take two credits worth of physical education, but students are on their own after that.

Some students understand the importance of a healthy lifestyle by having gym memberships and bringing food from home. Most students, however, find it challenging to fit healthy habits into their busy lives.

There are some opportunities for students to get moving on campus, but they interfere with many students’ schedules.

Zumba and dance classes are offered to students every Wednesday at 11 a.m., but that is during Common Hour and may interfere with students’ club commitments. There is also a weight room open to students at the Brookhaven Gymnasium, but the hours are very inconsistent.

Maintaining a healthy diet is another important factor that many college students tend to brush aside. Fast food is convenient for the average student who does not have the time to make their own meals. The cafeteria is where most students end up in between classes. The lack of healthy – and delicious – options further increase the issue.

The cafeteria at SCCC offers a plethora of food options including Chinese food, pizza, and a Moe’s Southwest Grill. The great number of food options is favored amongst students, but what about the healthy options?

The so-called “nutritious” food area in the cafeteria lies in a refrigerated section in the middle of the food court. Some food options include salads, wraps, sushi and fruit. Unlike the other stations in the food court, the healthy area rarely gets updated with new and interesting food options. It’s always the same Caesar salads and spicy tuna rolls that lack in the flavor department.

Because SCCC is not taking student wellness as seriously as they should, students may forget just how important it is to maintain a healthy lifestyle. It is not all about looking your best, but, rather, feeling your best.

With academic and life stress being in the way, having a healthy lifestyle may not seem like another important part of life. When in fact, the healthy choices you make now will determine your health in the future.

In order to have a greater emphasis on student health, I think SCCC needs to make some changes in order to resonate with students. Providing a bigger, creative and more updated selection of healthy food options may interest students to make better food choices in school and outside of it.

As far as exercise is concerned, requiring students to take a physical education course every semester may be a challenge because of other graduation requirements. However, SCCC should invest in building another weight room on campus for students who want to work out on their own time.