Tag Archives: college students

How social media plays a role in anxiety and depression for college students

Some would say when you reach college, you start to reach that phase of your life before adulthood. If you’re stressed, should you blame it on teachers, blame it on yourself, or blame it on social media?

According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, some factors that cause social media anxiety disorder are interrupting conversations to check your social media accounts, telling people how much time you spend on social media when the reality is another story, using your phone in class and avoiding work to share posts on specific websites. Thirty percent of college students spend more than 12 hours per week and this could lead to them isolating themselves from their work, friends and family.

A study by Stanford’s Children Health found that suicide is the third leading cause of death in 15- to 24-year-olds. There are 25 attempted suicides to one suicide that happened. Females are more likely to commit suicide than males. The study found that 34 percent of students suffered from cyberbullying and only 38 percent admit it to their parents.

Limiting social media usage

A 2018 University of Pennsylvania study monitored 143 undergraduates reducing their use of social media to 10 minutes per platform, per day. The results showed reductions in loneliness and depression.

Research also shows that using social media more than usual can’t just cause anxiety, but also attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, problems with mental functioning and paranoia.

Studies by the American Psychological Association show that college students who use Facebook show signs of psychological disorders like staying away from family members and not being involved in group activities. Students who checked Facebook at least once during a 15-minute period got lower grades.

For one student, social media
is a positive ‘getaway’

Jonathan Pelaez, 18, a liberal arts major is his second semester at Suffolk, said he believes social media can be a getaway from stress.

“Whenever I’m thinking of a test grade, I go on Twitter or Instagram to watch some videos to help me laugh and forget about the test,” Pelaez said. “I definitely don’t think it solves all my problems, but it sure helps me get away with problems in college and life in general.”

Although social media may have negative impacts, it would be unfair to not look at the positives it may provide. Social media provides a method of communication for students and an easy way to message each other through apps like Whatsapp, Facebook, Instagram and iMessage. Another advantage that social media provides to college students is being able to gain more knowledge, there’s easier access to relationships.

According to Techjury.net, the use of social media, college students can also feel belittled by watching others party or be intimidated by others for their grades, which leads to cyberbullying. For example, if there’s a party happening, and you didn’t get invited you’re going to feel some type of way. Instead of trying to get invited to the next one, you shut yourself off and don’t make an effort for it because you have accepted defeat.

Photo: Jonathan Pelaez, 18, a liberal arts major.

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Why do students choose SCCC? 5 people share their stories

Every student at Suffolk County Community College has a different story and a different purpose for attending the school.  Some say it’s the convenience of being close to home. Others seek to save up before transferring someplace else. Others either are still “looking to find themselves” or have come across hurdles in their lives that Suffolk is helping them to overcome.

Here are five people who shared their reason for choosing to come to Suffolk.

Jamie Gilmore, 19
Business retail management

Gilmore, of Middle Island, is a business retail management major. She originally attended Florida Atlantic University last year, but found that to be cost prohibitive.

“It was so expensive to go to FAU, especially since I live here on Long Island. Suffolk is so much more convenient,” Gillmore said. “Plus, I don’t have to worry about eating bad food from the cafe or spending my working money on some decent food. It’s nice to be able to come home every day to a nice home-cooked meal. Going away to college isn’t meant for everyone, but I’m just glad that I at least tried it to see for myself.”

Tanner Bardes, 20
Liberal arts major

Bardes, 20, of Wading River, at first said he wasn’t sure why he came to Suffolk.

“I guess since I saw all of my friends and siblings going to college, I just caught a [Fear of Missing Out],” said Tanner, who said he has a passion for creating music.

“There’s so many times that I believe that I’m wasting my time here when I could be making music and building my portfolio, you know I’ve always enjoyed music so much and eventually I want to be either a rapper or a producer or maybe even both.”

Vincent Alvino, 19
Liberal arts major

Alvino, 19, of Coram, said he’s “Honestly not sure what I want to do yet. Coming here to SCCC is convenient. It isn’t expensive. It gives me options of potential future career opportunities, and it gives me options to go to other schools,” Alvino said. “This is exactly what I need.”

Sydney Geddes, 19
Occupational therapy assistant

Geddes, of Medford, is an occupational therapy assistant and was originally going to the University of Cortland for track until an unfortunate turn in events occurred in her family.

“My dad lost his job and couldn’t help me with my loans for Cortland” after a long sigh, Sydney continued to say “For now, I’m going to make the best of my time here and get my associates degree and then transfer to Stony Brook to finish up.”

“It was early August.” She paused to gather herself after getting choked up. “August 12, 2018, to be exact. I was in my room, checking off items on my list of things to bring upstate with me to college and I heard a knock on my door. I saw both of my parents come in and close the door behind them. My parents never knock and they never both come into my room at the same time so I knew something was up. My heart began to beat nearly out of my damn chest.”

“Depressed wasn’t even the word to describe how I was feeling,” she continued. “But little did I know, this was the best thing that’s ever happened to me. I can stay home in my nice comfy bed, keep my job while going to school, and I don’t have to do track anymore so it’s the best of both worlds.”

 

10 ways SCCC students enjoy their coffee

The No. 1 school supply for a college student is coffee. Just take a look around. Students everywhere can be caught carrying a cup of coffee in addition to the backpack and books.

Here’s how some students enjoy their java.

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Photo by Courtney Nigro (April 10, 2018)

Maria Massumeci is drinking a cinnamon almond milk iced macchiato before dashing off to class.

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Photo by Courtney Nigro (April 11, 2018)

Melissa Parente, 18, a hotel and resort management major stopped at Starbucks for a muffin and Hazelnut Caramel Macchiato to kick-start her day.

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Photo by Courtney Nigro (April 11, 2018)

Students are always packing the Starbucks in the Babylon Student Center. Between class times, there is always a wait for coffee.

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Photo by Courtney Nigro (April 9, 2018)

Heather Comancho, 18, an education major, is sipping on an iced coffee. “I was falling asleep in class. I really need my coffee,” said Comacho.

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Photo by Courtney Nigro (April 9, 2018)

On this day, Starbucks had run out of caramel for Comancho’s usual order of an iced caramel coffee, she is adding sugar to get her coffee to her desired sweetness.

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Photo by Courtney Nigro (April 9, 2018)

Tara Roden, 19, criminal justice majo,  is a Starbucks regular. “The employees know my name and my order because I’m there every day,” she says. Her coffee even complies with the library’s “Snacks, Not Meals” rule, so she could sip it while studying for a test

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Photo by Courtney Nigro (April 11, 2018)

Starbucks is not the only source of caffeine for students. The Islip Arts building has an espresso machine, where an espresso shot is $1.

Photo by Courtney Nigro (April 17, 2018)

Students are also bringing coffee from home to save money while still getting a caffeine fix. It’s also library-friendly.

Photo by Courtney Nigro (April 11, 2018)

Starbucks seems to be students most popular choice for caffeine, it is the newest addition to the campus for the 2017-2018 school year, and students can purchase it using their ID card.

Photo by Courtney Nigro (April 17, 2018)

If the Starbucks line is too long, and there’s just not enough time to wait, the cafeteria has a coffee station, too.

Balancing college, work, family … argh!

Photo: Steven Gerasamovich former SCCC baseball team captain and pitcher, who found balancing school work and other responsibilities a real tough order. But he continues to study hard. Photo by Courtney Nigro

Some may think being a student at a community college like Suffolk is easier than going away to a four-year college or university. But attending a commuter school often brings on more responsibilities for students.

Many students who attend SCCC not only have to study, but also work at least one job. Between work, school, family, a social life, and whatever else students are involved in, it can be a lot to balance.

Steven Gerasimovich, 20, a liberal arts major, was a pitcher on the baseball team for the maximum of two years until 2017. While on the team, Gerasimovich had to take 12 credits a semester, so he was going to school full time,  playing baseball and working part-time at Planet Fitness in Centereach.

“There were definitely some nights where I was up past midnight doing homework because I didn’t have time during to get my work done, but in the end, I got everything done on time,” Gerasimovich said.

Julia Riggs, 18, an engineering major,  who works full time at Pandora in the Smith Haven Mall said he work and school schedules were particularly hectic .

“My manager was usually understanding of my school work — my professors didn’t seem to care, which was OK with me. I knew what I was getting myself into and what was expected of me at school,” Riggs said.

When by students how much they should spend studying, adjunct business professor Rob Ferrara said, “At least the same amount of time spent in class should be spent out of class if you want to do well.”

When he was playing baseball, Gerasimovich only worked on the weekends, and his Planet Fitness managers would schedule him for 6-9 a.m. so he could be out and make it to practice or a baseball game on time. His days started with an 8 a.m. class and were fully scheduled until 6 pm. He found time to study between his classes. There was also the added pressure of keeping his grades up to keep his spot on the team.

“I think school would have definitely been easier if I didn’t have a job, but I try not to let outside things affect my schooling,” Gerasimovich said.

Riggs is a full-time student who needed to work to pay for tuition.

“I didn’t have the option of only going to school and focusing my time on that,” she said.

Working 40-plus hour weeks, she found time to study on her breaks at work. After her 12-hour shifts that ended around midnight, she would try and study but found it hard to retain anything.

“If I didn’t have to work, I would be able to stay on top of my school work and feel like I actually had a life,” she said.