Men’s, women’s basketball advance in NJCAA playoffs

Suffolk’s men’s and women’s basketball teams both advanced to the second round of the NJCAA conference playoffs this past week.

The undefeated men’s team faced Dutchess Community College and soundly defeated them 84-50.

In the first half, Suffolk and their suffocating defense played a big role, limiting their opponent to 20 points. In the second half, they displayed their artillery, outscoring their opponent 52-30.

Tyree Grimsley was a figure with 24 points, six rebounds and three steals, Steven Tynes had 19 points, 10 assists, five rebounds and four steals. James Signer had 12 points, eight rebounds, four blocks and Jaye Bookhart had ten 10 points.

With this win, the Sharks move on to the Regional XV Semifinal where they will face Queensborough Community College this Saturday at 7:15 p.m. at Borough of Manhattan Community College.

They had two previous meetings this season, with the Sharks being victorious in both games. They averaged 91 points per game and held their opponent to 68 points.

The women’s basketball team defeated Borough of Manhattan Community College 52-37 in the first round of playoffs. They go on to play Nassau Community College for the second round of playoffs at Borough of Manhattan Community College on Saturday.

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Suffolk basketball heads to playoffs after historic 24-0 record

Suffolk’s basketball team capped off a historic season Feb. 19 with a 123-45 rout of the Borough of Manhattan Community College,  completing the regular season with a perfect 24-0 record.

The Sharks, ranked No. 1 in the NJCAA, are set to play Dutchess Community College in the Section XV Division III conference playoffs in the Ammerman campus Brookhaven Gymnasium at 8 p.m. Tuesday.

The team had not previously ended a season undefeated. Suffolk has beaten Dutchess twice this season.

Standout point guard Steven Tynes, who coach Victor Correa has described as the team’s leader, led the way for the Sharks in the win against Manhattan (20-8), scoring 29 points. He also had five rebounds, 10 assists and eight steals.

“It feels great. We worked hard all season. The results speak for themselves,” Tynes said. “It means everything to be a leader. I push everyone and they all push me.” 

Tynes had strong backup. Ryan Graziano had 16 points and seven rebounds. James Signer had 19 points, 10 rebounds and four blocks,  and Tyree Grimsley added 15 points, nine rebounds and eight steals. RJ Walker had 12 points. Jon Agostino added four points and 10 assists.

Last season, the Sharks had three losses, all coming against Nassau County Community College. But this year, they topped Nassau in both of their two matches. “It means everything. It’s nice to beat Nassau, our direct rival. We worked a bit harder this year,” Signer said.

The Sharks averaged 91 points per game this season, while allowing 71 points. They shot 50 percent from the field and held their opponents to a low 39 percent. They shot 37 percent from beyond the arc while holding their opponents to 32 percent. They also averaged 39 rebounds, 22 assists, 12 steals and six blocks per game.

“I think a lot of people fail to realize the work ethic of this team,” said Kyle Dowd, 18, a radio and TV major who in his second semester at Suffolk who attended eight games this year. “They’ve been displaying this type of basketball all year and the results showed in the 24 games they’ve played this year,” Dowd said. “They really wanted this game against Nassau. You could tell.”

Tynes finished the season averaging 21 points, 9.5 assists and 3.6 rebounds shooting 50.2 percent from the field. Grimsley averaged 18 points and 8.5 rebounds while shooting 71 percent from the field. Graziano averaged 13 points shooting 45 percent from the field.

Jaye Bookhart, who averaged 11 points while nailing three assists and three boards, shooting 44 percent from the field, said the team has to go into the playoffs with a specific mindset.

“In playoffs, everyone is 0-0,” he said. “We’re going back to the basics and keep getting buckets.” 

SUNY Provost Laursen calls for expansion of online courses

SUNY Provost Tod A. Laursen said during a visit to Suffolk’s Ammerman campus Feb. 21 that the state system is planning an aggressive expansion of its online courses and several other innovative initiatives to help it grow and adapt.

“We’re going to make a real push into the online space,” said Laursen, who was appointed in September as SUNY’s chief academic officer, to a group of more than 100 faculty, staff and students in the Montauk Point Room of the Babylon Student Center.

“Even though the system was early [in offering online courses], we don’t have very many exclusively online learners.”

Laursen said the courses not only offer flexibility to some potential students, but also are important to advancing the system’s reputation.

Laursen also said SUNY is looking at “micro-credentialing” options.

The system’s ultimate goal, Lauren said, is not to just enroll students, but to have them complete their degrees.

“I think the challenge for the system academic office is to try to actually help where it can and stay out the way where it can,” said  Laursen, whose job is to work with all of the system’s 64 campuses.

In response to a student’s question about how SUNY gets students involved in the process of developing new programs, Laursen said he believes there’s room for students’ voices to be more prominent. 

Laursen also touched on open education resources, or materials developed by faculty. OER materials could be used to dramatically reduce textbook costs and provide up-to-date information. 

While not many faculty members in the audience said they used OER material, Paul Beaudin, vice president for academic affairs, said Suffolk is the third-largest user of OER materials in SUNY, and the college has received a small grant from the system to support its initiatives.

Two conferences were held on the subject and another workshop on this is planned for Professional Development Day on March 12, he noted in a follow-up email to faculty and staff.

SCCC needs a sports recreational club

There are many different clubs and activities at SCCC that students can get involved in on campus. They range from the Disney Club to the Astronomy Club to the Hogwarts at Suffolk Club.

With the weather getting warmer and even for the beginning of the school year in the fall, I believe that we should try and form a sports recreational club, in which students who are not on sports teams at school  can play a pick-up game of any sport, such as flag football, baseball, basketball and volleyball during common hour.

I feel that if students could create this club students can have an opportunity during common hour so that they can be outside and be playing a sport that they enjoy.

Creating a recreational sports club here on campus could benefit multiple students who want an opportunity to play a competitive sport for their enjoyment.

Thomas Bell, 20, a liberal arts major, says that creating this club would give students that used to play sports an athletic outlet to help them stay in shape.

Bell also believes that students can use the club to use it as a stress reliever by doing something they love and taking them off the classroom mindset.

John Ricciardelli, 24, a liberal arts major, says that he believes if the club is created, it gives the opportunity to someone who is a non-student athlete the opportunity to play on a recreational sports team for fun.

Ricciardelli also wants the club to be created because students should be able to play sports for fun. Ricciardelli feels it’s a great way to make friends and have a great experience.

This club should be created because it gives the students an interactive club along with one that revolves outdoor events. It gives the enjoyment to a bunch of kids with the same interest in sports to just have a good time.

For SGA’s elections to have more involvement, it needs greater authority

The college holds the Student Government Association’s elections each spring semester. This year, they happened from April 8 to April 13 — five days during which students could vote online, in the college’s website homepage for their favorite representatives running for office for the 2018-2019 school year.

However, the recent elections didn’t do as well as last year’s. This time, 197 students from the Ammerman campus voted. Compared to 2017, when there were 405 hits, the number is significantly low. But why?

One of the main reasons was the number of candidates running for the vacant positions, said Laura Garcia, the current president of SGA. In 2017, two candidates ran for president and two for vice president.

As a result, “there was more promotion, debate and campaigning,” she said.

This year, only one person ran for president. Besides that, no one ran for vice president, secretary or treasurer.

Another reason can be the lack of awareness about what SGA actually does. Most people might infer that this organization has a lot of power in the decision-making processes that happen on campus. However, this is not the case for the student governance bodies at Suffolk County Community College.

SGA’s mission is to advocate for students’ rights, responsibilities and freedoms. It serves as a channel between faculty members, students and administration. However, no one holds a seat on the SCCC board of trustees, nor does SGA have a say in how student activity fees are spent, as do many student government organizations, including all four-year SUNY colleges and universities. SGA’s job is to communicate any issue to the student trustee, Jerome Bost.

Bost is the sole student representative on the college’s 10-member board. He represents all the students from the three campuses, exposing their concerns and being that voice in the decision-making process.

SGA spends a good portion of its annual budget mainly in giveaways, as minor contributions to the wellness of the student body.

“We want more ability to be able to oversee certain things, which is what we’re pushing forward now,” said Garcia. SGA is very limited in what they actually do on campus, so they try to help other organizations in events, as a way of promoting the services that the campus offers.

I think that this factor also plays an important role in how much students around the campus are informed, not only in the elections, but in the overall SGA’s role. The majority of the students don’t show much interest in what happens with this organization. Many others might do, but lacking the knowledge and information.

The Student Government Association in the Ammerman campus needs more promotion, better ways to get to students, who are intended to be the ones benefited from SGA’s work. If students are more involved, then more would be interested in being part of it, as well as voting for people to represent them. However, it is important to take away some of the limitations that restrict them to do more for the college community in general.

SCCC trustees propose a record $350 tuition rate hike

Thanks By Courtney Nigro and Alexa LaRosa

The Suffolk County Community College board of trustees proposed a $226.4 million budget for the 2018-2019 school year at its April 19 meeting that would increase tuition by a record $350.

The increase would boost annual tuition from $4,870 to $5,220 for full-time students. Part-time students would also be impacted, as the cost per credit would increase from $203 to $218.

The SCCC budget calls for a 4 percent increase in the county’s contribution to college costs, but, according to Newsday, Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone wanted the school to include only a 1.5 percent increase.

In its resolution, the board said the increase is necessary to meet the operational needs of the college.

The spending package was approved in a 6-1 vote. Student trustee Jerome Bost dissented. Bost could not immediately be reached for comment.

SCCC spokesman Drew Biondo said the college is waiting on the county’s contribution to the budget.

“We’re cognizant of student’s feelings about a tuition increase,” Biondo said. “We will do everything in or power to keep the education at our college affordable.”

The legislature will take up the issue in the next few weeks.

The board of trustee’s next meeting is scheduled for 4 p.m. today in the boardroom of the Learning Resource Center at the Grant Campus in Brentwood.

The fashion around Suffolk

At SCCC, the student body is made up of a diverse group of people, each with different backgrounds and fashion sense. Whether they’re sporting bold pieces or simple accessories, each individual has their own style to offer.

1. High Tops

IMG_0863High top Converse is a staple to include in any wardrobe. Classic white, cool patterns or a flashy solid color can help spice up any outfit.

2. Accessories

Image uploaded from iOS (2)Accessories and statement pieces such as watches, necklaces and eccentric belt buckles help pull any outfit together.

3. Ripped Jeans

Image uploaded from iOS.jpgRipped jeans have been “in” for years and have been evolving as the years go on. Whether it’s wide knee rips or a single rip with frayed ends, each style can be a key piece in anyone’s look.

4. Athleisure

Image uploaded from iOS (3)Athleisure is a new style that has been taking over rapidly. It’s a mix of leisure clothes and athletic wear. Companies such as Adidas have been producing and releasing more clothes that are dual functional and not just for working out.

5. Denim on denim

image-uploaded-from-ios-4.jpgDenim on denim has received negative feedback in the past, but it’s making a comeback. The most iconic denim on denim duo are jeans and a cute jean jacket.

6. Dress Shirts

Image uploaded from iOS (5)Button-up shirts are a good way to come across more professionally. You can choose a button-up with short sleeves to accommodate the approaching warmer weather and a playful or busy pattern to showcase your style personality.

7. Cardigans

Image uploaded from iOS (1)Cropped and full-length cardigans are a good way to keep an outfit stylish while also staying warm. Full-length cardigans can be worn during gloomy days while cropped cardigans can be used to add flair to any outfit even on a warmer day.